University of Delaware – Master of Science in Cybersecurity

School Level Program Admissions

Norwich University

Master Online Master's in Criminal Justice Website

Campbellsville University

Master MS in Justice Studies: Criminology Track Website

Campbellsville University

Master MS in Justice Studies: Public Services Leadership and Social Justice Track Website

Fairleigh Dickinson University

Master Master of Science in Cyber and Homeland Security Website

Utica University

Master MBA Economic Crime and Fraud Management Website

Michigan State University

Master Online Master of Arts in Criminal Justice Website

Saint Mary's University of Minnesota

Master Master of Science in Cybersecurity Website

View more online criminal justice programs currently accepting applications.

School Level Program Admissions

University of Delaware

Master Master of Science in Cybersecurity Website

University of West Florida

Master Cybersecurity, M.S. Website

Utica University

Master Master of Professional Studies in Cyber Policy and Risk Analysis Website

Utica University

Master MS in Cybersecurity Website

Utica University

Master MS in Cybersecurity - Computer Forensics Website

Utica University

Master MS in Cybersecurity - Cyber Operations Website

Utica University

Master MS in Cybersecurity - Electronic Crime Website

Still Looking for a Criminal Justice Program?

Below are some of the top criminal justice degree writeups. You can review the program page, or schools by state to find detailed information about the degree or career.

Thomas Jefferson University – B.S. Law Enforcement Leadership

School Level Program Admissions

Norwich University

Bachelor Online Bachelor’s in Criminal Justice Website

Utica University

Bachelor Online BS in Criminal Justice Website

Point University

Bachelor Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice Website

Campbellsville University

Bachelor BS in Criminal Justice Administration Website

Concordia University - Saint Paul

Bachelor BA in Criminal Justice Website

King University

Bachelor BS in Criminal Justice Website

Notre Dame College

Bachelor Bachelor of Arts in Criminal Justice  Website

View more online criminal justice programs currently accepting applications.

School Level Program Admissions

Thomas Jefferson University

Bachelor B.S. Law Enforcement Leadership Website

Utica University

Bachelor Bachelor's in Criminal Intelligence Analysis Website

Utica University

Bachelor BS in Criminal Justice - Cyber Criminology and Policy Website

Utica University

Bachelor BS in Fraud and Financial Crime Investigation Website

Virginia Wesleyan University

Bachelor Bachelor of Arts in Criminal Justice Website

Alvernia University

Bachelor Addictions and Mental Health Treatment (formerly Behavioral Health) Website

Anna Maria College

Bachelor Bachelor of Science in Fire Science Website

Still Looking for a Criminal Justice Program?

Below are some of the top criminal justice degree writeups. You can review the program page, or schools by state to find detailed information about the degree or career.

Police Studies Programs

School Level Program Admissions

Thomas Jefferson University

Bachelor B.S. Law Enforcement Leadership Website

University of Delaware

Master Master of Science in Cybersecurity Website

View more online criminal justice programs currently accepting applications.

We have 520 police studies programs in our database.

What Is the Focus of Police Studies?

Police studies, or police science, refers to the study of the techniques, principles, and theories of law enforcement from both a historical and contemporary perspective. Police studies degree programs are designed for students who are considering careers in policing as well as individuals who are currently employed in law enforcement.

School Level Program Admissions

Campbellsville University

Master MS in Justice Studies: Public Services Leadership and Social Justice Track Website

Concordia University - Saint Paul

Bachelor BA in Criminal Justice Website

Fairleigh Dickinson University

Master Master of Science in Cyber and Homeland Security Website

King University

Bachelor BS in Criminal Justice Website

Notre Dame College

Bachelor Bachelor of Arts in Criminal Justice  Website

Point University

Associate Associate of Arts in Criminal Justice Website

Thomas Jefferson University

Bachelor B.S. Law Enforcement Leadership Website

Find Police Studies Programs in Your State:

What Are the Benefits of Earning a Degree in Police Studies or Law Enforcement?

In an effort to hire highly qualified individuals, law enforcement agencies are increasingly requiring applicants to have a college degree. While a criminal justice degree covers the basics of policing, earning a degree in police studies or law enforcement can provide you with a more comprehensive education. If you’re interested in a particular issue in law enforcement, such as terrorism or cyber crime, pursuing a graduate degree in police studies can prepare you for a specialized career. At the local or state level, your degree may qualify you for employment as a police officer, sheriff’s deputy, correctional officer, or criminal investigator. Federal law enforcement jobs include working for the Federal Bureau of Investigation, Customs and Border Patrol, Immigration Services, the Department of Homeland Security, or the Drug Enforcement Administration.

What Are the Degree Requirements?

Depending on what type of career you’re interested in, you could earn a police studies or law enforcement degree at the associate’s, bachelor’s, or master’s level. The kinds of classes you may have to take include criminal law, criminal procedure, criminal investigation, restorative justice, forensics, terrorism, community policing, psychology, and sociology. In addition to meeting the educational requirements, there are other qualifications you’ll need to have to become a police officer. Generally, applicants must be able to successfully complete a physical training program and pass a criminal background check.

Job Outlook for Law Enforcement

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, employment of police and other law enforcement officers is expected to increase by 7 percent through the year 2020. Hiring for positions at the state and federal levels tends to be more competitive and candidates who are bilingual or have previous military experience are highly desirable. The majority of law enforcement officers work as sheriff’s deputies or police patrolmen, but detectives and criminal investigators also account for a sizable segment of the field. As of May 2010, the median annual wage for a police officer was $55,010, with the highest salaries earned by detectives and those employed at the federal level.

Still Looking for a Criminal Justice Program?

Below are some of the top criminal justice degree writeups. You can review the program page, or schools by state to find detailed information about the degree or career.

Career Profile: U.S. Marshal

School Level Program Admissions

Fairleigh Dickinson University

Master Master of Science in Cyber and Homeland Security Website

Thomas Jefferson University

Bachelor B.S. Law Enforcement Leadership Website

University of Delaware

Master Master of Science in Cybersecurity Website

View more online criminal justice programs currently accepting applications.

The U.S. Marshals Service is the oldest federal law enforcement office in the country, (though the U.S. Customs Service is the oldest federal agency in the United States). U.S. Marshals have a wide range of responsibilities, including running the federal witness protection program, safeguarding prisoners awaiting trial, and bringing fugitives to justice. The service is also tasked with providing enforcement for the federal court system, which means providing security for federal courthouses, protecting federal judges, conducting investigations, and enforcing the orders of the judiciary and the attorney general.

What Are the US Marshals?

Established in 1789, the U.S. Marshals were directed to provide enforcement services by President George Washington. The service presently has 94 marshals, with more than 3,000 deputy marshals. Deputy Marshals work hand-in-hand with state and local police agencies to track down and capture wanted and escaped criminals.

School Level Program Admissions

Campbellsville University

Master MS in Justice Studies: Public Services Leadership and Social Justice Track Website

Concordia University - Saint Paul

Bachelor BA in Criminal Justice Website

Fairleigh Dickinson University

Master Master of Science in Cyber and Homeland Security Website

King University

Bachelor BS in Criminal Justice Website

Notre Dame College

Bachelor Bachelor of Arts in Criminal Justice  Website

Point University

Associate Associate of Arts in Criminal Justice Website

Thomas Jefferson University

Bachelor B.S. Law Enforcement Leadership Website

Requirements

Candidates entering the U.S. Marshals Service must be between the ages of 21 and 36 and have a valid driver’s license. They must also hold a bachelor’s degree—though a master’s degree is preferred—along with three years’ relevant work experience. Relevant work experience includes work in law enforcement, investigations, writing reports, and knowledge of the law and its application.

Exams

Candidates must pass a thorough and extensive background investigation, along with passing an oral interview, polygraph examination, and medical evaluation. The application process for the U.S. Marshals Service is protracted, taking from nine months to a year to complete.

Training Program

Once accepted, candidates are required to attend a 17-week training program at the Federal Law Enforcement Training Center (FLETC) in Glynco, Georgia. A few of the subjects covered during training include: legal training, defensive tactics, firearms training, physical conditioning, driver training, evidence and procedure, first aid, search and restraint, computer training, security, survival, entry and search, high-threat trials, search and seizure, surveillance, and protective service training.

After graduation, candidates must be willing to relocate and take their duties within any of the 94 districts. They are required to remain at their first duty assignment for a minimum of three years.

Because it is the oldest law enforcement agency in the United States, the Marshals Service is expected to be part of the federal justice system in the future. The Marshals service hires sporadically as need requires. This need is predicated on vacancies and funding at any given time. Potential candidates are advised to visit the employment page of the U.S. Marshals Service to find out when hiring will take place.

Deputy Marshals earn between $38,000 and $48,000 during their first year. Geographical location determines the exact figure. At the end of the first year of employment, they are eligible for promotion and pay raises.

Still Looking for a Criminal Justice Program?

Below are some of the top criminal justice degree writeups. You can review the program page, or schools by state to find detailed information about the degree or career.

Career Profile: FBI Agent

School Level Program Admissions

Fairleigh Dickinson University

Master Master of Science in Cyber and Homeland Security Website

Thomas Jefferson University

Bachelor B.S. Law Enforcement Leadership Website

University of Delaware

Master Master of Science in Cybersecurity Website

View more online criminal justice programs currently accepting applications.

FBI agents work for the Federal Bureau of Investigation, which is the chief investigatory office of the federal government, along with being one of the world’s most elite law enforcement agencies. Called special agents, FBI agents utilize various means of intelligence to protect the country and apprehend those who violate federal laws. FBI agents investigate crimes such as terrorism, espionage, white-collar crime, bank robberies, blackmail, racketeering, drug trafficking, interstate criminal activity, copyright infringement, and civil rights violations.

What Does an FBI Agent Do?

The primary duty of an FBI agent is to gather and analyze intelligence and investigate crimes. Agents do a variety of jobs from tracking stolen goods across state lines to examining business records. They go undercover when necessary, and utilize legal wiretaps and high-tech surveillance.

Specialties

FBI agents choose one of five specialties: intelligence, counterterrorism, criminal, cyber, or counterintelligence. Agents who choose counterintelligence or counterterrorism may opt to pursue another specialty, e.g., weapons of mass destruction.

School Level Program Admissions

Campbellsville University

Master MS in Justice Studies: Public Services Leadership and Social Justice Track Website

Concordia University - Saint Paul

Bachelor BA in Criminal Justice Website

Fairleigh Dickinson University

Master Master of Science in Cyber and Homeland Security Website

King University

Bachelor BS in Criminal Justice Website

Notre Dame College

Bachelor Bachelor of Arts in Criminal Justice  Website

Point University

Associate Associate of Arts in Criminal Justice Website

Thomas Jefferson University

Bachelor B.S. Law Enforcement Leadership Website

FBI Entry Requirements

Anyone desiring to become an FBI agent must pass stringent entry requirements. Potential agents must have graduated from an accredited college or university and have a minimum of three years’ work experience in a professional capacity.

Applicants to the FBI must have exceptional qualifications in one of the following areas: accounting, computer science/information technology, language, law, or be diversified. The competition is fierce. Thus, candidates with exceptional academic credentials and/or foreign language skills will have an advantage over others.

Potential agents must be U.S. citizens (or citizens of the Northern Mariana Islands), 23 to 37 years of age, and possess a valid driver’s license. Moreover, applicants must pass the special agent physical requirements, which are very demanding, as well as an all-embracing FBI background check.

After qualifying for the entry program, applicants are categorized based upon skills and abilities for which the FBI has a current need. The following skill sets are usually in demand and receive priority on a demand basis: accounting, finance, engineering, foreign language fluency, legal, investigative, military, physics, chemistry, biology, and technology.

Quantico Training

Successful applicants are sent to Quantico, Virginia, where they attend the FBI Academy. The training period is 21 weeks and is very intensive.  Trainees live on the campus and participate in classroom studies as well as intensive physical training, defensive tactics, practical exercises, and firearm training.

About the FBI

The FBI maintains fifty-six field offices throughout the United States. Recently graduated special agents will be assigned to one of these field offices. FBI Agents begin as GS-10 employees on the government pay scale and may advance to the GS-13 grade level in field assignments. Promotions to higher levels are based on education and performance. With locality and other pay adjustments, new FBI Agents earn from $61,100 to $69,000 per year.

Still Looking for a Criminal Justice Program?

Below are some of the top criminal justice degree writeups. You can review the program page, or schools by state to find detailed information about the degree or career.

The Best Preparation for Becoming a Police Officer

School Level Program Admissions

Thomas Jefferson University

Bachelor B.S. Law Enforcement Leadership Website

University of Delaware

Master Master of Science in Cybersecurity Website

View more online criminal justice programs currently accepting applications.

Many college students think of their criminal justice degree as a means to obtain police employment. Alternatively, if they are already on the job, they think in terms of how the job will enhance their promotional opportunities. What most don’t think about is how classroom instruction relates directly to doing the job. In other words, yes, a criminal justice degree will make you a more prepared candidate during the police officer selection process, but it will also make you a better police officer. Here are three ways the classroom is going to help you on the street.

Every good investigation, undercover operation, and street bust ends with paperwork. Police work involves reams upon reams of paper. Often, the better the arrest, the more complex the arrest report. Just making that good arrest isn’t enough; police work is about documenting what we saw, heard, collected, or did. Good police work is about writing clear, concise, and comprehensive reports that ensure the district attorney will file charges and a jury will convict.

School Level Program Admissions

Campbellsville University

Master MS in Justice Studies: Public Services Leadership and Social Justice Track Website

Concordia University - Saint Paul

Bachelor BA in Criminal Justice Website

Fairleigh Dickinson University

Master Master of Science in Cyber and Homeland Security Website

King University

Bachelor BS in Criminal Justice Website

Notre Dame College

Bachelor Bachelor of Arts in Criminal Justice  Website

Point University

Associate Associate of Arts in Criminal Justice Website

Thomas Jefferson University

Bachelor B.S. Law Enforcement Leadership Website

Qualifying for the job

1) Complete high school and earn your diploma

The first step in becoming a police officer is obtaining your high school degree or GED. Some agencies may prefer graduates from bachelor’s programs, but a high school diploma is often the minimum requirement for agencies around the country.

2) Review your local agencies criminal background requirements

Depending on where you live and the individual requirements of law enforcement agencies in your area, there may certain restrictions concerning criminal backgrounds that can prevent you from becoming a police officer. Misdemeanor crimes, speeding tickets, and past drug use are some crimes that can often be dismissed when applying to enter into the force. However, more serious convictions such as felonies, recent drug-related charges, and domestic abuse are often deal-breakers for upcoming applicants.

3) Taking and completing the Police Enforcement Entrance Exam

One of the major requirements for becoming a police officer includes the police entrance exam. This examination is required for all upcoming police officers and contains items that test a person’s ability in math, reading comprehension, writing, and grammar. Since a lot of the knowledge required for the examination is covered in bachelor’s programs that focus on criminal justice, students that complete this degree program may find the exam easier than those taking the examination right after a high school education. Regardless of which path you take, taking the time to study for the examination is suggested.

4) Enroll in and complete the Police Academy

Probably one of the most hands-on requirements for becoming a police officer is completion of the Police Academy. At the academy, recruits may be expected to spend time in the classroom learning more about weapon usage, police strategy, mental awareness, and community partnership. The layout of courses in the police academy is similar to what is seen in a college course, including the administration of tests and reviews. In addition to these lessons, participants must also be active in physical training. This portion of the academy may include physical exercise, running, wall climbing, strength building, and obstacle courses.

5) Find your career path

Once you have completed all of the requirements to become a police officer, your experience as a uniformed officer can lead to even more diverse opportunities in the field. There are numerous opportunities within law enforcement for you to exhibit your skills and knowledge. Depending on your level of education and experience in the field, you may have opportunities open to you within specialized divisions of law enforcement, such as becoming a detective, working in specialized drug units, fish and game wardens, or even for SWAT teams. At higher levels, police officers may even be eligible to find careers in immigration, The Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives, or even the U.S. Secret Service.

Common questions for upcoming police officers

  • Is there a physical that I will need to pass?: As part of police academy training, recruits may have to take part in physical testing in order to pass successfully. Most academies require that applicants complete 20 or less sit-ups and pushups, as well as a 1 to 1.5 mile run. In addition to this requirement, applicants must also take part in a routine health physical that screens for issues with the individual’s personal health and wellness.
  • Should I expect my hours to be like a normal work week?: Police officers are often scheduled around the clock. In this line of work, it is vital that officers are available at all hours of the day, making it reasonable to assume that you might have unusual shifts at some point during your career. Police officer are sometimes given multiple opportunities for over-time throughout their career, which is a great way to gain extra earnings and more experience while employed. As a new police officer, you should be open to working different types of shifts as you learn the ropes in the police force.
  • Are there vision and/or hearing requirements?: Due to the nature of the position, most agencies have vision requirements that applicants must meet before being approved to work in the field. Most standards for vision include 20/20 binocular corrected, a minimum of 20/40 uncorrected, and no color-blindness or other pathological conditions. Hearing requirements may vary depending on the agency, but most require that applicants to not have hearing loss that exceeds 30 decibels.
  • Are there age requirements for becoming a police officer?: In terms of a minimum age, some police departments require that applicants be 21 or over prior to becoming eligible. However, there are police departments that allow applicants at the age of 18 with an appropriate high school diploma or GED. Our team encourages you to review the requirements of your local police agency to ensure that you are aware of their specific requirements. There are currently no maximum age limits for most police departments in the U.S.

Every undergraduate, as well as graduate, paper you write begins with a thesis. In the police work, the thesis is that a certain suspect committed a certain crime. Just as in college, you have to find research that supports your thesis. On the job, you record, order, and explain evidence that supports your thesis that the suspect committed the crime. All the writing you do in college will prepare you to write good police reports and, thus, make you a better cop.

Cop work is about one thing—talking to people. You will interview victims, informants, suspects, and witnesses. The list of people you are going to be talking to is endless. The people you are going to be talking to come from all walks of life. They are going to be different races and different genders. Some are going to be wealthy and some are going to be hooked on heroin. The best cops can talk and listen to everyone.

All college curriculum provides components that are going to strengthen your ability to listen and speak with a wide variety of people. Coursework on different cultures, or how cultures relate, will help you develop a wider base of listening and understanding skills. These skills will help you better interview a victim, suspect, or witness. Coursework on public speaking or giving presentations will assist you in developing your ability to communicate.

Writing and interviewing will remain critical skills for police officers; however, as we move further into the 21st century, a police officer’s ability to understand and use technology will become essential. We are not talking about the ability to use a word processor, a radio, or search some database—those skills are essential now. Cops must do crime analysis. Police work is moving to become more data driven and much more data predictive. Terms such as “directed patrol” flow directly from research and theories developed in the classroom. As data become more important, so will data analysis. Even the cop on the beat is required to understand what the data about crime on his or her beat means.

The deeper your understanding of how crime analysis theories work, the better your understanding of the tasks your sergeant is going to give you. The better you understand the tasks, the better your performance. Pay attention in your psychology, sociology, and economics courses. Someday, when you are trying to figure out why a robbery suspect is committing crimes on certain days you will wish you had.

Still Looking for a Criminal Justice Program?

Below are some of the top criminal justice degree writeups. You can review the program page, or schools by state to find detailed information about the degree or career.